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Monsoon Nepali book review and summary subin bhattarai

Book: Monsoon

Author: Subin Bhattarai

Genres: Friction & Romance

Publisher: Fine Print

The story begins with Rameshwor’s marriage. His marriage occurs unexpectedly. After his breakup with his girlfriend, his family hunts for a female and he marries within a week. He did, however, fall in love with a female prior to marriage. He proposes to her after chatting on Facebook, but her family objects, so he gets married to show her.

Sundar and Shuban, his two best buddies, begin to peek at the girls in his marriage. Meanwhile, Shuban notices a modest girl wearing a basic sari with no jewelry in the food line. She has the appearance of a teacher.

During the wedding, he is solely focused on that girl and follows her, but he later fails to notice her. He wishes to speak with her but is unable to do so. He hopes they will meet the next day at the celebration. Fortunately, she appears to the party the next day. He sees her on a regular basis.

Unfortunately, Shuban’s friend Sundar was also fixated by her, something he didn’t appreciate. She approaches him after a few minutes and asks, 

“Where are you from?”

“Kathmandu.”

“I didn’t ask the place. I said from which side are you from: bride or bridegroom?”

“From bridegroom side.”

“Do you know me?”

“Yes?” He felt nervous.

“Do you know me?”

“No.”

They began a new chat once this one ended. He didn’t tell her name when he asked for it. Despite the fact that she didn’t know her name, he introduced himself and departed the scene. On the way, he felt bad about not knowing her name. He felt he could have done a virtual search.

She had made him a Facebook friend request on the same day. Monsoon was her name, and he accepted her buddy request. They began speaking after that. He’d begun to fall in love with her. Her issue, though, was that she was cranky. She used to converse when she wanted to, and she used to ignore when she didn’t. Furthermore, he was frequently enraged when she did not answer the phone.

CONCLUSION

The story is straightforward, and the language is straightforward as well. Furthermore, the tale is similar to viewing a movie. Not only that, but Rameshwor, Sundar, and Shuban have a natural friendship. Their disagreements, egos, and fights could be pertinent to today’s friendships. Falling in love with the same girl, receiving rejection from the same girl, and having the ego prevent you from speaking to your best friends is all very natural and well-presented.

The plot is a straightforward love story. It piques the readers’ interest in what will happen next. Why was Monsoon acting so strangely? Why does she despise Shuban while also adoring him? This piques my interest. More importantly, will Shuban still love her despite her behavior?

Rameshwor and Sundar are two of my favorite characters. They’re funny and make the audience chuckle. Shuban’s character exemplifies the crazy of today’s youth. With Monsoon, he can’t stay angry for long. He adores her and wishes to spend as much time with her as possible. At the same time, he is sometimes tested by her behavior. Monsoon, on the other hand, is somber. She is a character that is both perplexed and frustrated. She can be both cheerful and sad at the same moment. A reader may despise her for her actions: why was she acting so strangely? Why didn’t she accept Shuban’s love, who was always there for her? Finally, due of the tale, language, and characters, the book should be read.

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